Watch now
We have built the first "browser" to the World Wide Voice Web, our Genie open-source virtual assistant. To scale up cost-effectively, we have created a Pretrained Agent Generator that can produce transactional dialogue agents from just database schemas, API signatures, and a few samples of natural language utterances.

We are now ready to apply it to the WWW. The idea is to standardize on APIs and provide open pretrained agents that interface to the APIs. For example, restaurants provide a menu and an ordering API in the standardized format, and they get a voice agent for ordering food. We believe an open, decentralized voice web (WWvW) will surpass any proprietary walled gardens.

Decentralization of the voice web promotes equal opportunity, global inclusion and accessibility, and consumer privacy. In this workshop, experts from academia and industry will discuss the concepts, technology, and the ongoing standardization effort to create the WWvW, as well as the formation of an open voice ecosystem and its social value. Our panelists include Jerry Yang (Yahoo co-founder), Xuedong Huang (Microsoft), Mark Dalton (UN), Chris Dix (BBC), Cathy Pearl (Google), Lowell Robinson (KQED), Jon Stine (Open Voice Network), Paulus Schoutsen (Home Assistant), Richard Socher (You.com), Hugh McGrory (Sonify), and Edward Chang, Jerry Kaplan, Chris Manning, and Chris Piech from Stanford.

You can watch the workshop recording using this link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uq2tovXeC8k

Agenda

Time Event
Workshop Opening
Breakfast
Welcoming Remarks
Monica Lam, James Landay, and Chris Manning, Stanford University

Monica Lam is a Professor in the Computer Science Department at Stanford University since 1988. She is the faculty director of the Open Virtual Assistant Lab (OVAL). She received a B.Sc. from University of British Columbia in 1980 and a Ph.D. in Computer Science from Carnegie Mellon University in 1987. Monica is a Member of the National Academy of Engineering and Association of Computing Machinery (ACM) Fellow. She is a co-author of the popular text Compilers, Principles, Techniques, and Tools (2nd Edition), also known as the Dragon book. Professor Lam's current research is on conversational virtual assistants with an emphasis on privacy protection. Her research uses deep learning to map task-oriented natural language dialogues into formal semantics, represented by a new executable programming language called ThingTalk. Her Almond virtual assistant, trained on open knowledge graphs and IoT API standards, can be easily customized to perform new tasks. She is leading an Open Virtual Assistant Initiative to create the largest, open, crowdsourced language semantics model to promote open access in all languages. Her decentralized Almond virtual assistant that supports fine-grain sharing with privacy has received Popular Science's Best of What's New Award in Security in 2019. Prof. Lam is also an expert in compilers for high-performance machines. Her pioneering work of affine partitioning provides a unifying theory to the field of loop transformations for parallelism and locality. Her software pipelining algorithm is used in commercial systems for instruction level parallelism. Her research team created the first, widely adopted research compiler, SUIF. Her contributions in computer architecture include the CMU Warp Systolic Array and the Stanford DASH Distributed Memory Multiprocessor. She was on the founding team of Tensilica, now a part of Cadence. She received an NSF Young Investigator award in 1992, the ACM Most Influential Programming Language Design and Implementation Paper Award in 2001, an ACM SIGSOFT Distinguished Paper Award in 2002, and the ACM Programming Language Design and Implementation Best Paper Award in 2004. She was the author of two of the papers in "20 Years of PLDI--a Selection (1979-1999)", and one paper in the "25 Years of the International Symposia on Computer Architecture". She received the University of British Columbia Computer Science 50th Anniversary Research Award in 2018, and an ASPLOS Influential Paper Award in 2021.

James Landay is a Professor of Computer Science at Stanford University, specializing in human-computer interaction (HCI). Previously, Dr. Landay was a Professor of Information Science at Cornell Tech in New York City and prior to that a Professor of Computer Science & Engineering at the University of Washington. His current research interests include Technology to Support Behavior Change, Demonstrational Interfaces, Mobile & Ubiquitous Computing, and User Interface Design Tools. He is the founder and co-director of the World Lab, a joint research and educational effort with Tsinghua University in Beijing. Dr. Landay received his BS in EECS from UC Berkeley in 1990 and MS and PhD in Computer Science from Carnegie Mellon University in 1993 and 1996, respectively. His PhD dissertation was the first to demonstrate the use of sketching in user interface design tools. He was previously the Laboratory Director of Intel Labs Seattle, a university affiliated research lab that explored the new usage models, applications, and technology for ubiquitous computing. He was also the chief scientist and co-founder of NetRaker, which was acquired by KeyNote Systems in 2004. From 1997 through 2003 he was a professor in EECS at UC Berkeley.

Christopher Manning is a professor of computer science and linguistics at Stanford University, Director of the Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, and Co-director of the Stanford Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence Institute. He works on software that can intelligently process, understand, and generate human language material. He is a leader in applying Deep Learning to Natural Language Processing, including exploring Tree Recursive Neural Networks, neural network dependency parsing, the GloVe model of word vectors, neural machine translation, question answering, and deep language understanding. He also focuses on computational linguistic approaches to parsing, natural language inference and multilingual language processing, including being a principal developer of Stanford Dependencies and Universal Dependencies. Manning is an ACM Fellow, a AAAI Fellow, an ACL Fellow, and a Past President of ACL. He has coauthored leading textbooks on statistical natural language processing and information retrieval. He is the founder of the Stanford NLP group (@stanfordnlp) and manages development of the Stanford CoreNLP software.
The World Wide Voice Web and the Genie Virtual Assistant (video)
Monica Lam, Giovanni Campagna, Tony Espinoza, Mehrad Moradshahi, Sina Semnani, Neil Souza, Silei Xu, and Jackie Yang, Stanford University

Find out how we can build a World Wide Voice Web. See Genie, the first WWvW virtual assistant, at work on the Home Assistant local gateway and the Baidu smart speaker. Genie is built with pretrained agents using a Pretrained Agent Generator. All the software is open-source.

Break
WWvW for Humanity
Conversation on Why AI Needs to Understand All the World’s Languages (video)
Host: Brent Phillips, Producer, Humanitarian AI Today
Guests:

Brent Phillips is a longtime volunteer humanitarian relief worker and former United Nations staff member who produces the Humanitarian AI Today podcast series and heads Humanitarian AI meetup groups in fifteen cities. Members, who are mostly students, researchers, and AI developers, discuss humanitarian applications of artificial intelligence with humanitarian actors and work on volunteer projects useful to the humanitarian community. Currently, Brent is pursuing a Master’s degree in Computer Science at Northeastern University’s new Roux Institute in Portland, Maine where he heads a Google Developer Student Club and the club’s Voice and Conversational AI Lab.

Mark Dalton is a versatile leader with experience in international development, strategy, operations and change management, partnerships and technology. He has had the privilege to work in international humanitarian aid - leading relief teams in crises, co-founding a British aid agency and serving with the UN in multiple roles in coordination, communication and information. As chief of information for the UN’s humanitarian coordination office, he led a digital transformation and served on its executive team through a major change process. He is currently working at the interface of data technology and social impact.

Moussa grew up in Guinea, worked in the tech industry for 10 years, and is now a first-year CS Ph.D. student advised by Chris Piech at Stanford. He is interested in developing AI for African languages and catalyzing STEM education in West Africa through GNCode, an NGO he co-founded with Lisa Einstein.

Chris Piech, PhD, is a Professor of Computer Science at Stanford University who specialises in the use of computational techniques to better understand education. His research in education is driven by a passion for teaching.
Panel: Will There be a WWvW? (video)
Moderator: John Markoff, Fellow, Stanford HAI.
Panelists:
John Gregory Markoff is a journalist best known for his work covering technology at The New York Times for 28 years until his retirement in 2016, and a book and series of articles about the 1990s pursuit and capture of hacker Kevin Mitnick. He is also the journalist who wrote the first article on the WWW in 1993. Markoff was born in Oakland, California, and grew up in Palo Alto, California. He graduated from Whitman College, Walla Walla, Washington, with a B.A. in sociology in 1971. Additionally, he received an M.A. in sociology from the University of Oregon in 1976.

Xuedong Huang is a Chinese American computer scientist and technology executive who has made contributions to spoken language processing and AI Cognitive Services. He is Microsoft's Technical Fellow and Chief Technology Officer of Azure AI. Huang is a strong advocate of AI for Good, AI for Accessibility, and AI for Cultural Heritage. Huang received his PhD in EE from the University of Edinburgh in 1989 (sponsored by the British ORS and Edinburgh University Scholarship), his MS in CS from Tsinghua University in 1984, and BS in CS from Hunan University in 1982.

Samuel Jerrold "Jerry" Kaplan is an American computer scientist, author, futurist, and serial entrepreneur. He is a Lecturer and Research Affiliate at Stanford University’s Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law in the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies. He is best known as a pioneer in the field of pen computing and tablet computers. He is the founder of numerous companies, including GO Corporation, whose technology was used to develop the first smartphone and tablet PC. Kaplan is the co-founder of OnSale, the first B2C online auction site launched in 1994, five months prior to eBay. He is a recipient of the 1998 Ernst & Young Emerging Entrepreneur of the Year Award and author of the best-selling book Startup: A Silicon Valley Adventure. He has been featured in major news publications, including The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Forbes, Red Herring, and Bloomberg Businessweek. Kaplan is also the author of the 2015 book Humans Need Not Apply: A Guide to Wealth and Work in the Age of Artificial Intelligence. Additional companies he has co-founded include artificial intelligence company Teknowledge, Inc. and social game website Winster.com. Kaplan was briefly a Fellow at the Stanford Center for Legal Informatics.

Christopher Manning is a professor of computer science and linguistics at Stanford University, Director of the Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, and Co-director of the Stanford Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence Institute. He works on software that can intelligently process, understand, and generate human language material. He is a leader in applying Deep Learning to Natural Language Processing, including exploring Tree Recursive Neural Networks, neural network dependency parsing, the GloVe model of word vectors, neural machine translation, question answering, and deep language understanding. He also focuses on computational linguistic approaches to parsing, natural language inference and multilingual language processing, including being a principal developer of Stanford Dependencies and Universal Dependencies. Manning is an ACM Fellow, a AAAI Fellow, an ACL Fellow, and a Past President of ACL. He has coauthored leading textbooks on statistical natural language processing and information retrieval. He is the founder of the Stanford NLP group (@stanfordnlp) and manages development of the Stanford CoreNLP software.

Jon Stine works as a Research Affiliate for the Auto-ID Laboratory of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), with a focus on artificial intelligence/voice and conversational commerce. He serves as a Consulting Affiliate with The Sprosty Network, the superb Minneapolis-based retailing and product-concept consulting firm. He’s a senior advisor to the New York- and Columbus-based Retail Future Lab, and advisor/participant with start-ups in the States and Europe.

Jerry Chih-Yuan Yang (born November 6, 1968) is a Taiwanese-American billionaire computer programmer, internet entrepreneur, and venture capitalist. He is the co-founder and former CEO of Yahoo! Inc. Yang founded Yahoo! in 1994, served as CEO from 2007 to 2009. He left Yahoo! in 2012. He founded a venture capital firm called AME Cloud Ventures and, as of 2015, serves on several corporate boards. According to Rob Solomon, a venture capitalist at Accel Partners, Yang was "a great founder, evangelist, strategist and mentor," having "created the blueprint for what is possible on the Internet."
Lunch
The Beginning of a WWvW Ecosystem
Panel: The Open Voice Information Ecosystem (video)
Moderator: Ann Grimes, Stanford University
Panelists:

Lowell Robinson is a creative digital experience designer, producer and team builder, focused on human-centered design processes and solutions. He has joined KQED as its first-ever Senior Producer of Voice and AI. Since then, he has been inventing, planning and building new products and experiences to bring life to KQED's mission and content in the new mediums of the 21st century. Before that, he created and led the Digital Experience Lab, a prototyping production and incubation group that blended emerging technologies with the Exploratorium's tangible approach to inquiry-based learning.

Hugh McGrory has 15 years experience leading cross-functional teams for innovative media productions and software products; with 4 years as Chief Executive Officer at a product design start-up building virtual reality experiences and mobile web applications for clients including Google News Initiative, Mozilla and EY, 5 years as Chief Innovation Officer at an experiential marketing company driving earned media strategies for clients including Vimeo and the National Film Board Of Canada through interactive activations, and 6 years as Creative Director and Executive Producer in media production leading an Ireland-based film and animation studio.

Ann Grimes currently serves as Managing Director, Journalism Fellowship at the Starling Lab for Data Integrity at Stanford / USC. She served as interim director of the Knight-Bagehot Fellowship in Economics and Business Journalism at Columbia's Graduate School of Journalism where she also taught classes in the business of journalism. Earlier, she co-directed the bi-coastal Brown Institute for Media Innovation, anchored at Columbia and Stanford University's School of Engineering and has served as Director of Stanford's Graduate Program in Journalism. She has taught classes at the intersection of media and technology in Stanford's Department of Computer Science, Graduate School of Business, the Hasso Plattner School of Design (the d.school), and Department of Communication. A veteran journalist, she has held senior editorial positions at The Wall Street Journal and The Washington Post. She earned her MA from the University of Chicago, BA from Georgetown, and was a John S. Knight Fellow at Stanford.

Chris Dix is an innovative thinker engaged in transforming ideas and technologies into next generation solutions, with a career spanning over 20 years in the communications, broadcast and media sectors. His specialities lie in the Media and Entertainment industry where he has a proven track record in providing vision and leadership in quality, efficiency, cost control, team building, and scalable growth where he brings a broader perspective to media businesses blessed with world-class talent and exceptional challenges. During his time at the BBC, he has provided strategic direction and recommendation across the digital product portfolio where a high degree of duplication and low transparency existed. The recommendations presented have enabled greater transparency and a pathway towards reduced duplication, cost and time to audiences whilst also evolving a number of commercial opportunities that enable additional income. This approach has enabled the creation of a number of communities of interest that continue to tackle common technology strategy and architecture challenges across the organisation.

Edward Chang, a pioneer of data-driven deep learning and parallel machine learning algorithms, is currently serves as an adjunct professor at Stanford CS department and AI/NLP advisor at SmartNews (a Japan's unicorn). His 2010/11 data-driven deep learning patents filed at Google and sponsorship to Stanford ImageNet project contributed to the current AI revolution. Ed was a full professor of Electrical Engineering at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He joined UCSB in 1999 after receiving his PhD from Stanford University. He is a recipient of the NSF Career Award and Google Innovation Award. He is also an IEEE Fellow for his contributions to scalable machine learning.

Richard Socher is the founder of you.com, the world's first open search engine platform that summarizes the web for users, with extensible apps, superior privacy choices, actionable results and personalization through preferred sources. Prior to you.com, Richard was the Chief Scientist of Salesforce, where he led the company's AI efforts. He joined Salesforce after the company acquired his first AI startup, MetaMind. He received his Ph.D. from Stanford where he was recognized for his groundbreaking work on deep learning. He is also a former adjunct professor in Stanford's Computer Science Department.

Cathy Pearl works at Google as a design manager on Google Assistant, and is the author of the O'Reilly book, "Designing Voice User Interfaces". She's been creating Voice User Interfaces (VUIs) for over 20 years and is passionate about helping everyone make the best conversational experiences possible. Previously, Cathy was VP of User Experience at Sensely, whose virtual nurse avatar helps people stay healthy. She has worked on everything from programming NASA helicopter pilot simulators to designing a conversational iPad app in which Esquire magazine's style columnist tells users what they should wear on a first date. She has an MS in Computer Science from Indiana University and a BS in Cognitive Science from UC San Diego.

An assessment of the current voice ecosystem and the use of voice in journalism in the future

Representation of Task-Oriented Dialogues (video)
Monica Lam, Chris Manning, Giovanni Campagna, Mehrad Moradshahi, Sina J. Semnani, Silei Xu, Stanford University; Abhinav Rastogi, Google Research; Yu Su, Huan Sun, Ohio State University

Jonathan Berant is an associate professor at the Blavatnik School of Computer Science, and a Research Scientist and The Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence. His main field of research is Natural Language Processing. He works on Natural Language Understanding problems such as Semantic Parsing, Question Answering, Paraphrasing, Reading Comprehension, and Textual Entailment. He is mostly excited about learning from weak supervision that is easy to obtain and grounded in the world, and in tasks that require multi-step inference or handling of language compositionality.

Sonal Gupta builds machine learning models for conversational AI systems. She currently lead a team of research scientists and machine learning engineers in the Facebook Conversational AI team working on smarter language understanding. Previously, she worked on Viv's NLP platform, which was acquired by Samsung and released as Bixby 2.0 and Bixby Developer Center. She got a PhD in NLP from Stanford University in bootstrapping information extraction using very few examples. She has a Masters from UT Austin where she worked on multi-modal vision+NLP models.

Kaihua Zhu works as a Chief Technology Officer, DuerOS BU & Chief Architect at Baidu, which is a Data Collection & Internet Portals company with an estimated 41K employees. It was founded in 2000. He is C-Level manager in the Engineering & Technical department. Kaihua graduated from Shanghai JiaoTong University and is currently based in Beijing, China. He used to work at Microsoft.

Monica Lam is a Professor in the Computer Science Department at Stanford University since 1988. She is the faculty director of the Open Virtual Assistant Lab (OVAL). She received a B.Sc. from University of British Columbia in 1980 and a Ph.D. in Computer Science from Carnegie Mellon University in 1987. Monica is a Member of the National Academy of Engineering and Association of Computing Machinery (ACM) Fellow. She is a co-author of the popular text Compilers, Principles, Techniques, and Tools (2nd Edition), also known as the Dragon book. Professor Lam's current research is on conversational virtual assistants with an emphasis on privacy protection. Her research uses deep learning to map task-oriented natural language dialogues into formal semantics, represented by a new executable programming language called ThingTalk. Her Almond virtual assistant, trained on open knowledge graphs and IoT API standards, can be easily customized to perform new tasks. She is leading an Open Virtual Assistant Initiative to create the largest, open, crowdsourced language semantics model to promote open access in all languages. Her decentralized Almond virtual assistant that supports fine-grain sharing with privacy has received Popular Science's Best of What's New Award in Security in 2019. Prof. Lam is also an expert in compilers for high-performance machines. Her pioneering work of affine partitioning provides a unifying theory to the field of loop transformations for parallelism and locality. Her software pipelining algorithm is used in commercial systems for instruction level parallelism. Her research team created the first, widely adopted research compiler, SUIF. Her contributions in computer architecture include the CMU Warp Systolic Array and the Stanford DASH Distributed Memory Multiprocessor. She was on the founding team of Tensilica, now a part of Cadence. She received an NSF Young Investigator award in 1992, the ACM Most Influential Programming Language Design and Implementation Paper Award in 2001, an ACM SIGSOFT Distinguished Paper Award in 2002, and the ACM Programming Language Design and Implementation Best Paper Award in 2004. She was the author of two of the papers in "20 Years of PLDI--a Selection (1979-1999)", and one paper in the "25 Years of the International Symposia on Computer Architecture". She received the University of British Columbia Computer Science 50th Anniversary Research Award in 2018, and an ASPLOS Influential Paper Award in 2021.

Christopher Manning is a professor of computer science and linguistics at Stanford University, Director of the Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, and Co-director of the Stanford Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence Institute. He works on software that can intelligently process, understand, and generate human language material. He is a leader in applying Deep Learning to Natural Language Processing, including exploring Tree Recursive Neural Networks, neural network dependency parsing, the GloVe model of word vectors, neural machine translation, question answering, and deep language understanding. He also focuses on computational linguistic approaches to parsing, natural language inference and multilingual language processing, including being a principal developer of Stanford Dependencies and Universal Dependencies. Manning is an ACM Fellow, a AAAI Fellow, an ACL Fellow, and a Past President of ACL. He has coauthored leading textbooks on statistical natural language processing and information retrieval. He is the founder of the Stanford NLP group (@stanfordnlp) and manages development of the Stanford CoreNLP software.

Abhinav Rastogi received a degree in electrical engineering from Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA and IIT Bombay, Mumbai, India. He is currently a Senior Research Engineer and Engineering Manager with Google Research. His research interests include natural language understanding, language generation, and multimodal dialogue. He organized the schema-guided dialogue state tracking challenge in 2019 as part of the eighth dialogue system technology challenge (DSTC8), and was a part of the organizing committee of DSTC9.

Yu Su is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at the Ohio State University. Before coming to OSU, he was Senior Researcher at Microsoft Semantic Machines working on conversational AI. He got his PhD from University of California, Santa Barbara and his bachelor degree from Tsinghua University, both in Computer Science. His awards includes Outstanding Dissertation Award from UCSB and Best of IEEE ICDM 2019 Selection.

Huan Sun has been an assistant professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at the Ohio State University (OSU) since Fall 2016. Prior to that, she spent half a year as a visiting scientist at the University of Washington, and received a Ph.D. in Computer Science from University of California, Santa Barbara (2015) and a B.S. in EEIS from the University of Science and Technology of China (2010). Her research interests lie in natural language processing (NLP), data mining, and artificial intelligence, with emphasis on natural language interfaces (NLIs) to texts, tables, knowledge graphs, relational databases and computer programs (i.e., question answering, semantic parsing, program synthesis) and making such NLIs interactive and conversational to help users complete tasks through dialogue (i.e., task-oriented dialogue systems, conversational AI).

Luke Zettlemoyer is a research manager and site lead for FAIR Seattle. He is also a Professor in the Allen School of Computer Science & Engineering at the University of Washington. His research is in empirical computational semantics, where the goal is to build models that recover representations of the meaning of natural language text. Recent work has focused on language modeling pretraining, multi-lingual NLP, semantic parsing, question answering, and information extraction. Luke's honors include a PECASE Award and being named an Allen Distinguished Investigator, along with more than ten paper awards at top NLP venues. He was a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Edinburgh and received his Ph.D. from MIT.

Design and rationale of ThingTalk: An Extensible, Executable Representation Language for Task-Oriented Dialogues

An Open IoT Ecosystem (video)
Paulus Schoutsen, CEO, Home Assistant

Paulus Schoutsen is the founder of Home Assistant. He sees Home Assistant as the key to the open and private home that everyone deserves. Over the last 5 years, he has grown Home Assistant from a script turning on the lights at sunset into one of the major open source home automation frameworks with a worldwide community.

Home Assistant is a private gateway for over 1,000 IoT devices.

An Industry Ecosystem for WWvW (video)
Jimmy Garcia-Meza, Co-Founder and CEO, CloudPlugs
Jimmy Garcia-Meza is an executive with 25 years of broad global experience and a successful track record in building startups and large revenues ($1.7B) in global public software, computer and semiconductor companies across multiple industries. Passionate about innovation, cutting edge technologies and building disruptive companies and high performance teams. Negotiated 3 buy/sell M&A transactions and large ($60M+) customer agreements. Experienced in venture capital and private equity.
Break
Tutorial: Genie Pre-Trained Agent Technology and Chirpy Social Bot
Pre-trained Question Answering Agents (video)
Silei Xu, Sina J. Semnani, Giovanni Campagna, and Monica S. Lam

Accurate answers to long-tail questions by training with mostly data synthesized with pretrained language models.

Pre-trained Dialogue Agents (video)
Giovanni Campagna, Sina J. Semnani, Mehrad Moradshahi, Silei Xu, Agata Foryciarz, and Monica S. Lam

Robust dialogue agents using a contextual semantic parsers trained with mostly synthesized data.

Pre-trained Multilingual Dialogue Agents (video)
Mehrad Moradshahi, Giovanni Campagna, Sina J. Semnani, Silei Xu, and Monica S. Lam

Get an agent for another language in a day, with the help of an entity-aware neural machine translator.

Pre-trained Customer Support Agents (video)
Giovanni Campagna, Nancy Xu, James Landay, and Monica S Lam

Perform web tasks on behalf of callers by reading English customer support instructions.

Chirpy Cardinal Social Bot (video)
Ethan Chi, Christopher D. Manning

The award-winning Social Bot from Alexa Prize 2021.

Workshop Closing
Closing Remarks
Monica Lam, James Landay, and Chris Manning, Stanford University

Monica Lam is a Professor in the Computer Science Department at Stanford University since 1988. She is the faculty director of the Open Virtual Assistant Lab (OVAL). She received a B.Sc. from University of British Columbia in 1980 and a Ph.D. in Computer Science from Carnegie Mellon University in 1987. Monica is a Member of the National Academy of Engineering and Association of Computing Machinery (ACM) Fellow. She is a co-author of the popular text Compilers, Principles, Techniques, and Tools (2nd Edition), also known as the Dragon book. Professor Lam's current research is on conversational virtual assistants with an emphasis on privacy protection. Her research uses deep learning to map task-oriented natural language dialogues into formal semantics, represented by a new executable programming language called ThingTalk. Her Almond virtual assistant, trained on open knowledge graphs and IoT API standards, can be easily customized to perform new tasks. She is leading an Open Virtual Assistant Initiative to create the largest, open, crowdsourced language semantics model to promote open access in all languages. Her decentralized Almond virtual assistant that supports fine-grain sharing with privacy has received Popular Science's Best of What's New Award in Security in 2019. Prof. Lam is also an expert in compilers for high-performance machines. Her pioneering work of affine partitioning provides a unifying theory to the field of loop transformations for parallelism and locality. Her software pipelining algorithm is used in commercial systems for instruction level parallelism. Her research team created the first, widely adopted research compiler, SUIF. Her contributions in computer architecture include the CMU Warp Systolic Array and the Stanford DASH Distributed Memory Multiprocessor. She was on the founding team of Tensilica, now a part of Cadence. She received an NSF Young Investigator award in 1992, the ACM Most Influential Programming Language Design and Implementation Paper Award in 2001, an ACM SIGSOFT Distinguished Paper Award in 2002, and the ACM Programming Language Design and Implementation Best Paper Award in 2004. She was the author of two of the papers in "20 Years of PLDI--a Selection (1979-1999)", and one paper in the "25 Years of the International Symposia on Computer Architecture". She received the University of British Columbia Computer Science 50th Anniversary Research Award in 2018, and an ASPLOS Influential Paper Award in 2021.

James Landay is a Professor of Computer Science at Stanford University, specializing in human-computer interaction (HCI). Previously, Dr. Landay was a Professor of Information Science at Cornell Tech in New York City and prior to that a Professor of Computer Science & Engineering at the University of Washington. His current research interests include Technology to Support Behavior Change, Demonstrational Interfaces, Mobile & Ubiquitous Computing, and User Interface Design Tools. He is the founder and co-director of the World Lab, a joint research and educational effort with Tsinghua University in Beijing. Dr. Landay received his BS in EECS from UC Berkeley in 1990 and MS and PhD in Computer Science from Carnegie Mellon University in 1993 and 1996, respectively. His PhD dissertation was the first to demonstrate the use of sketching in user interface design tools. He was previously the Laboratory Director of Intel Labs Seattle, a university affiliated research lab that explored the new usage models, applications, and technology for ubiquitous computing. He was also the chief scientist and co-founder of NetRaker, which was acquired by KeyNote Systems in 2004. From 1997 through 2003 he was a professor in EECS at UC Berkeley.

Christopher Manning is a professor of computer science and linguistics at Stanford University, Director of the Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, and Co-director of the Stanford Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence Institute. He works on software that can intelligently process, understand, and generate human language material. He is a leader in applying Deep Learning to Natural Language Processing, including exploring Tree Recursive Neural Networks, neural network dependency parsing, the GloVe model of word vectors, neural machine translation, question answering, and deep language understanding. He also focuses on computational linguistic approaches to parsing, natural language inference and multilingual language processing, including being a principal developer of Stanford Dependencies and Universal Dependencies. Manning is an ACM Fellow, a AAAI Fellow, an ACL Fellow, and a Past President of ACL. He has coauthored leading textbooks on statistical natural language processing and information retrieval. He is the founder of the Stanford NLP group (@stanfordnlp) and manages development of the Stanford CoreNLP software.
Reception

Venue

Jen-Hsun Huang Engineering Center Room 300 (aka the Mackenzie Room),
475 Via Ortega
Stanford, CA, 94305
Guests can park at Ortega Parking Garage located at 498 Via Ortega, Stanford, CA 94305.
For payments, please download ParkMobile app ahead of time, and use the parking code: 7202.
If you have any questions feel free to contact Andrea Brand-Sanchez (ajbrand@stanford.edu), Cell: 415-902-4675.

Acknowledgements

We thank our sponsors: National Science Foundation, Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, Verdant Foundation, and the Stanford Institute of Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence (HAI) for their support. We also thank our supporting partners in the Genie Virtual Assistant project: AlphaVantage (financial data), Baidu (smartspeaker development device), Home Assistant, Picovoice (wakeword), SmartNews, and Yelp. Genie is built on top of Bootleg (Named Entity Disambiguator, Stanford), icanhazdadjoke (jokes), Marian (machine translator), Microsoft (Bing, Azure Speech Technology), Spotify, and yr.no (weather).

We also wish to acknowledge the sponsorship of this workshop by ServiceNow and the Stanford HAI Institute.

Workshop Organizers

Prof. Monica Lam
Prof. James Landay
Prof. Chris Manning